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Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Cultivated and Native Tallgrass Prairie Soils of the Midwestern United States
Mackelprang, Rachel1; Grube, Alyssa M.2; Lamendella, Regina2; Jesus, Ederson da C.3,4; Copeland, Alex5; Liang, Chao4,6; Jackson, Randall D.4,7; Rice, Charles W.8; Kapucija, Stefanie1; Parsa, Bayan1; Tringe, Susannah G.5; Tiedje, James M.3,4; Jansson, Janet K.9
Corresponding AuthorTringe, Susannah G.(sgtringe@lbl.gov) ; Tiedje, James M.(tiedjej@msu.edu) ; Jansson, Janet K.(janet.jansson@pnnl.gov)
2018-08-15
Source PublicationFRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY
ISSN1664-302X
Volume9Pages:15
AbstractThe North American prairie covered about 3.6 million-km(2) of the continent prior to European contact. Only 1-2% of the original prairie remains, but the soils that developed under these prairies are some of the most productive and fertile in the world, containing over 35% of the soil carbon in the continental United States. Cultivation may alter microbial diversity and composition, influencing the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and other dements. Here, we explored the structure and functional potential of the soil microbiome in paired cultivated-corn (at the time of sampling) and never-cultivated native prairie soils across a three-states transect (Wisconsin, Iowa, and Kansas) using metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and lipid analysis. At the Wisconsin site, we also sampled adjacent restored prairie and switchgrass plots. We found that agricultural practices drove differences in community composition and diversity across the transect. Microbial biomass in prairie samples was twice that of cultivated soils, but alpha diversity was higher with cultivation. Metagenome analyses revealed denitrification and starch degradation genes were abundant across all soils, as were core genes involved in response to osmotic stress, resource transport, and environmental sensing. Together, these data indicate that cultivation shifted the microbiome in consistent ways across different regions of the prairie, but also suggest that many functions are resilient to changes caused by land management practices - perhaps reflecting adaptations to conditions common to tallgrass prairie soils in the region (e.g., soil type, parent material, development under grasses, temperature and rainfall patterns, and annual freeze-thaw cycles). These findings are important for understanding the long-term consequences of land management practices to prairie soil microbial communities and their genetic potential to carry out key functions.
Keywordsoil microbiome land management metagenomics native prairie climate change carbon cycle nitrogen cycle
Funding OrganizationOffice of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy ; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (DOE Office of Science BER) ; Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at PNNL ; U.S. Department of Energy ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program ; National Science Foundation ; NSF ; Research Coordination Network grant
DOI10.3389/fmicb.2018.01775
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectOffice of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy[DE-AC02-05CH11231] ; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (DOE Office of Science BER)[DE-FC02-07ER64494] ; Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at PNNL ; U.S. Department of Energy[DE-AC05-76RL01830] ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program ; National Science Foundation ; NSF[DBI-1248096] ; Research Coordination Network grant[RCN 1051481]
WOS Research AreaMicrobiology
WOS SubjectMicrobiology
WOS IDWOS:000441566600001
PublisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Citation statistics
Cited Times:12[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.imr.ac.cn/handle/321006/128743
Collection中国科学院金属研究所
Corresponding AuthorTringe, Susannah G.; Tiedje, James M.; Jansson, Janet K.
Affiliation1.Calif State Univ Northridge, Dept Biol, Northridge, CA 91330 USA
2.Juniata Coll, Dept Biol, Huntingdon, PA 16652 USA
3.Michigan State Univ, Ctr Microbial Ecol, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA
4.Univ Wisconsin, US DOE, Great Lakes Bioenergy Res Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA
5.US DOE, Joint Genome Inst, Walnut Creek, CA 94598 USA
6.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Appl Ecol, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples R China
7.Univ Wisconsin, Dept Agron, 1575 Linden Dr, Madison, WI 53706 USA
8.Kansas State Univ, Dept Agron, Manhattan, KS 66506 USA
9.Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, Earth & Biol Sci Directorate, Richland, WA 99352 USA
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Mackelprang, Rachel,Grube, Alyssa M.,Lamendella, Regina,et al. Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Cultivated and Native Tallgrass Prairie Soils of the Midwestern United States[J]. FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY,2018,9:15.
APA Mackelprang, Rachel.,Grube, Alyssa M..,Lamendella, Regina.,Jesus, Ederson da C..,Copeland, Alex.,...&Jansson, Janet K..(2018).Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Cultivated and Native Tallgrass Prairie Soils of the Midwestern United States.FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY,9,15.
MLA Mackelprang, Rachel,et al."Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Cultivated and Native Tallgrass Prairie Soils of the Midwestern United States".FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY 9(2018):15.
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