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Correlation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice - A restraint time-course analysis
Alternative TitleCorrelation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice: A restraint time-course analysis
Bao Li1; Yao Xinsheng2; Zhao Liang2; Lue Yanqing2; Kurihara Hiroshi2
2008
Source PublicationNEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH
ISSN1673-5374
Volume3Issue:2Pages:167-171
AbstractBACKGROUND: Changes in central neurotransmitter expression play all important role in stress response and forms the basis for stress-induced psychological and behavior changes.
Other AbstractBACKGROUND: Changes in central neurotransmitter expression play an important role in stress response and forms the basis for stress-induced psychological and behavior changes. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of different restraint stress intervals on brain monoamine neurotransmitter expression, and to investigate the correlation between stress response and neurotransmitter levels.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Chinese Herb and Natural Medicine Institute, Pharmacological College of Jinan University.MATERIALS: Sixty 7-week-old male Kunming mice of clean grade, weighing 18-22 g, were provided by the Guangdong Medical Experimental Animal Center. The experiment was in accordance with animal ethics standards.METHODS: This study was performed at the Chinese Herb and Natural Medicine Institute, Pharmacological College of Jinan University from June 2006 to May 2007. A restraint device for mice was constructed according to published reports. Experimental mice were adaptively fed for 1 week and randomly divided into a control group (n = 10) and an experimental group (n = 50). The experimental group was sub-divided into five restraint intervals: 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours (n = 10 mice per time point). Animals in the experimental group were not allowed to eat or drink during the restraint period. Mice in the control group did not undergo restraint, but had identical food and water restrictions. Cerebral cortex and hypothalamus were separated based on observational times and protein was extracted using perchloric acid. Central monoamine neurotransmitter levels were measured using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine hydrochloride (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphen-ylanetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-hydroxyindoleac-etic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus of mice.RESULTS: Sixty mice were included in the final analysis. ① NE levels in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and plasma: four hours after restraint, NE levels in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus ere significantly lower than control levels (P 0.05). In addition, NE levels in the plasma gradually increased with longer restraint time, which was significant between experimental groups and the control group (P < 0.05-0.01). ② Levels of DA, DOPAC, and HVA in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus: there were significant differences in DA levels in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus after 18 and 24 hours of restraint compared to control animals (P < 0.05). DOPAC and HVA levels in the cerebral cortex were enhanced with longer restraint time, and there was significant difference in all restraint groups compared to control levels (P < 0.01), except for DOPAC levels after 4 hours of restraint. Moreover, DOPAC and HVA levels in the hypothalamus were enhanced with increasing restraint time. Levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus: after short restraint periods and in the control group, 5-HT was not detectable. However, it was quantitatively detected at 12 hours after restraint. The 5-HT levels in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus reached peak levels at 12 and 18 hours of restraint. 5-HIAA levels in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus showed a similar tendency to increase with restraint time. 5-HIAA levels at 4-8 hours after restraint were significantly higher than control levels (P < 0.01). The 5-HIAA levels decreased at 12 hours after restraint, but remained significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Restraint stress affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes changes in monoamine neurotransmitters in brain tissues, which suggests stress status could be improved by adjusting HPA axis and neurotransmitter levels in the brain.
KeywordIMMOBILIZATION STRESS RAT-BRAIN SEROTONIN REGIONS central monoamine neurotransmitter restraint stress cerebral cortex hypothalamus
Indexed ByCSCD
Language英语
Funding Project[National Key Technologies RD Program]
CSCD IDCSCD:3252725
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.imr.ac.cn/handle/321006/146706
Collection中国科学院金属研究所
Affiliation1.中国科学院金属研究所
2.中国科学院广州地球化学研究所
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Bao Li,Yao Xinsheng,Zhao Liang,et al. Correlation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice - A restraint time-course analysis[J]. NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH,2008,3(2):167-171.
APA Bao Li,Yao Xinsheng,Zhao Liang,Lue Yanqing,&Kurihara Hiroshi.(2008).Correlation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice - A restraint time-course analysis.NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH,3(2),167-171.
MLA Bao Li,et al."Correlation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice - A restraint time-course analysis".NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH 3.2(2008):167-171.
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